Lavender Life has moved

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It has been a bit quiet on my blog the past few weeks, because I was traveling, working and… setting up a self-hosted blog. From now on you can find me over at lavenderlife.co. I’ll be publishing the same type of content as I did here, just on a different place. You can keep getting notifications about my blog in the mail, if you subscribe through my new url. There’s a subscribe button on the front page.

Thanks and see you there!

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How I experience anxiety.

Anxiety comes in many different shapes. Some people have social anxiety, they’re scared of social situations. Some have seemingly random panic attacks and others suffer from post traumatic stress disorder. Some break out in sweat, some yell and others turn silent.

To me, anxiety means thinking in worst-case scenarios. It means being worried about everything that can go wrong. It means overthinking all the possible outcomes of any situation. It means being scared of not living up to the expectations of others or the expectations myself. It means becoming tense in my shoulders, tense in my back and tense in my legs. It means becoming less aware of my surroundings. It means not being able to think straight. It means not being able to translate my feelings into words. It means blackouts. It means being afraid of winning and afraid of losing. It means total chaos.

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My story of living and dealing with asthma.

I’ve been an asthmatic since as long as I can remember. I was born with it, I grew up with it and I’ll grow old with it. It’s part of my life. It’s part of who I am. I want to share part of my story, using three topics that have been central in my battle with asthma: inhalers, needles and technology. 

I. Inhalers
On a rainy day, almost twenty years ago, I was diagnosed with asthma. Back then I didn’t really know what that diagnosis meant, the only thing I understood was that I had to take inhalers twice a day. They looked scary and tasted awful, and I didn’t want to come near them. Sometimes people told me I would get rid of the disease, that I would magically become healthy again. They gave me hope.

But over the years my lungs only became weaker. They started to hurt when I was running, biking or swimming. I had to stop taking part in certain school activities, such as physical education. I had to be careful when riding my bike. I had to sleep with a rescue inhaler. And I started to appreciate the medication more. They helped me bike and win. They postponed the pain. They saved me during asthma attacks. But I didn’t manage to get rid of the disease, instead my condition became progressively worse.

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7 Annoying questions I still get asked since my immigration to Norway.

About two and a half years ago I made the big move from Belgium to Norway. I love every part of living here, but some of the (recurring) questions I get from Belgians and Norwegians are pretty annoying. So I decided to share them with you.

1. “Are you used to living abroad already?”
I didn’t mind that question the first few times people asked me, it’s a normal question after all. However, I’ve been living here for MORE THAN TWO YEARS now. You can drop it. Stop asking me. If I wasn’t used to it by now I would have moved back already. The cultural differences aren’t that big either. Stop asking me. Please.

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My experience with the gratefulness challenge.

Studies have shown that the more grateful you are, the happier you become. This resulted into the gratefulness (or gratitude) challenge. The main idea is that you have to express gratitude on a daily basis, but I’ve seen it going around in different forms. There are no specific rules for this challenge and it can be as little as telling yourself “Today I was grateful for the nice weather”.

I’ve been doing the gratefulness challenge for half a year now. But does it work? Keep reading to find out.

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